Allan's Perspective is not recommended for the politically correct, or the overly religious! Some people have opinions, and some have convictions ..., what we offer is Perspective! (Sometimes I feel like I'm just a bobble-head on the highway of life!)

I was addicted to the hokey pokey, but I turned myself around!

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Just how strange is the future gonna be?

Ladies and gentlemen, the Internet is getting more invasive everyday!

We hear stories about how computers and the Internet is transforming society faster and in more ways than we ever imagined, but once I tell you just how insidious this technological creep is ....., you might just run and hide under the bed!

"OK Allan" you say, "just how intrusive are these new things?"

Well get a load of THIS bunky, these are all new toys and gadgets from "The Internet of Things!"

Internet of (Strange) Things
With the rise of wearables and other connected devices, there has been widespread buzz about the Internet of Things and how this new concept could change the face of the technology world.
Analysts and leading market vendors hail the Internet of Things, or IoT, as an efficient way of enhancing data-tracking measures and machine automation in the retail, manufacturing and health-care verticals.
However, some companies may have pushed the idea of connected devices over the top, particularly when it comes to the consumer market. From toilet seats to clothing, following are eight of the funnier IoT-related products to date.


1. Vessyl
Vessyl is a 13-ounce cup that knows what and tracks how much you pour into it. The container connects to an app on Apple iOS and Android mobile devices that shows the specific brand and flavors of the drink that users pour into it through built-in sensors.
The overall purpose of Vessyl is to help users understand how their caloric intake from liquid adds up over the course of the day and the week, as well as to help users keep track of the amount of water they drink. However, at $119, Vessyl is expensive. Plus, users will have to get used to the idea of plugging in their cup to be charged.


2. Hapifork
Hapifork, an electronic utensil, connects through Bluetooth to an online dashboard or a mobile device to track the speed at which the user eats. Hapifork promotes the message that eating too fast leads to poor weight control and digestion, and comes with a coaching program to help the user improve eating behaviors.
The 8-inch fork measures hand-to-mouth movement and runs on an ARM Cortex-M processor. It sells for $79 and comes in pink, blue, green and black.


3. Kolibree
If you're in the market for "the smartest and most elegant toothbrush," here you go. Kolibree is a connected toothbrush, aimed at improving dental health through advanced technologies for a "better brushing experience."
The toothbrush connects to an app that allows users to check their brushing sessions and "brushing zones" in the mouth, as well as receive oral tips and play oral-related mobile games on iOS and Android smartphone.
Kolibree has not yet hit the market, but the company invites preorders on its website.


4. Emiota Belty
Belty is a smart belt that automatically adjusts itself to the user's activities throughout the day, and keeps tabs on the user's waistline based on either meals consumed or exercise.
Unveiled by Emiota, a French startup company, at CES 2015, Belty connects to an app that charts data from your waistline, and also nudges you if you've been sitting for too long. The belt is equipped with small sensors and an accelerator.
The product is still undergoing development, according to Emiota, and the price has not yet been determined.


5. Lixil Satis
Lixil's Satis Bluetooth toilet allows customers to flush and clean the toilet through an app on their smartphones. The smart toilet also includes a built-in night light and automated cleansing features.
The Japanese product made headlines when Forbes  highlighted the fact that it was vulnerable to hacks, which could cause the toilet to scream and spray customers with the bidet while opening and closing its mouth, according to a Trustwave security advisor.
Lixil's Satis Bluetooth toilet allows customers to flush and clean the toilet through an app on their smartphones. The smart toilet also includes a built-in night light and automated cleansing features.
The Japanese product made headlines when Forbes  highlighted the fact that it was vulnerable to hacks, which could cause the toilet to scream and spray customers with the bidet while opening and closing its mouth, according to a Trustwave security advisor.

6. Davek Alert Umbrella
The Davek Alert Umbrella automatically prods users when they forget their umbrellas through a Bluetooth-based proximity chip. The chip broadcasts a silent signal to a connected smartphone app, which sends a reminder to the user's phone.
The app was developed for Apple's iOS and Android with Bluetooth 4.0, so that if the phone is held near the umbrella for 60 seconds, the umbrella will automatically connect.
The Davek Alert Umbrella is still under development and is a Kickstarter project, but will be shipped later in 2015 starting at $79 as part of the "early bird special" presale pledge program.
The Davek Alert Umbrella automatically prods users when they forget their umbrellas through a Bluetooth-based proximity chip. The chip broadcasts a silent signal to a connected smartphone app, which sends a reminder to the user's phone.
The app was developed for Apple's iOS and Android with Bluetooth 4.0, so that if the phone is held near the umbrella for 60 seconds, the umbrella will automatically connect.
The Davek Alert Umbrella is still under development and is a Kickstarter project, but will be shipped later in 2015 starting at $79 as part of the "early bird special" presale pledge program.

7. BlueMaestro Pacif-i Smart Pacifier
At CES 2015, English connected products manufacturer BlueMaestro unveiled a Bluetooth-enabled pacifier, dubbed the Pacif-i Smart Pacifier.
This new product records a baby's temperature and transmits that data to the parents' iOS and Android device, where it can be recorded and monitored. This product also contains proximity features to alert the parents' smartphone if the pacifier moves away.
The smart baby pacifier costs about $39 and is available for preorder.

8. We:Ex Alert Shirt
A year ago, Wearable Experiments (We:Ex) brought new technology to the apparel market with Alert Shirt, designed for sports fans to heighten their excitement during a game. The product ties real-time sports data to electronics in the jersey, which in turn simulates live-sports actions (i.e. "feel what the players feel.") For example, when a player is tackled the jersey will simulate that real-life action by vibrating.
The shirt is still under development.

 http://www.crn.com/slide-shows/networking/300077940/8-internet-of-things-products-that-kind-of-made-us-laugh.htm?pXFz=&wc=4&cid=sem_su&pQZz=