Allan's Perspective is not recommended for the politically correct, or the overly religious! Some people have opinions, and some have convictions ..., what we offer is Perspective!

(Sometimes I feel like I'm just a bobble-head on the highway of life!)

Monday, April 18, 2016

The bear facts!

Dear Readers:

I had just finished writing my thoughts for the day, and to quote Donald Trump, the story was huge and incredible ...., probably the best I've ever done!

After it was all finished, and the final few bits of polishing was done, I pressed "publish," AND THE GOD-DAMNED THING DISAPPEARED!

I mean, it can't have literally  disappeared off the face of the earth, but it is floating around on the Internet somewhere, and I have no idea where, or how to get it back!

I haven't gone near this bloody computer for about  eight hours now, and by this time I think I'm calm enough to write another one!

Wish me luck!

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Three archaeological sites that were used by Vikings around 1,000 years ago were excavated recently in Canada. The discoveries add to the single known Viking settlement in the New World, located at L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of Newfoundland. 
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Sagas from the time of the Vikings tell tales of their journeys into the New World, mentioning places named "Helluland" (widely believed to be modern-day Baffin Island), "Markland" (widely believed to be Labrador) and "Vineland," which is a more mysterious location that some archaeologists have argued could be Newfoundland. 
Shortly after these settlements were established, legend has it that the group was floundering due to lack of fish stocks off the Grand Banks, so they all moved to what is now Alberta!

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My son, who lives in B.C., saw a bear while out hiking on the weekend and fortunately it ran away when they got a little too close to it! (Most of the time a bear will run away on the approach of a human, but it is still important to know a bit about bears and their habits!)

With this in mind I have a little cautionary note from Parks Canada about what to do if you encounter a bear.

The first type of bear we are going to talk about is Yogi Bear.

Image result for Yogi bearYogi Bear is not, and should not, be confused with other types of bears in our parks and natural habitats.

Yogi is known to habitat picnic areas and other locations where there is a plentiful supply of food and activity. 

Unlike other bears he shuns the main bear diet of nuts and berries in favour of a campers pick-i-nick baskets, and will go to great lengths to get them.

Meanwhile, the grizzly bear is a type of brown bear. 
Some experts say the grizzly is a subspecies of brown bear, while others say the two bears are the same animal, and "grizzly bear" refers to brown bears that live in the interior of North America.
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Brown bears are found all over the world; grizzlies live in a smaller, specific area: the Pacific Northwest. According to the National Wildlife Federation, a distinction is made based on size, color and diet. People in North America use "grizzly bear" to refer to smaller and lighter-colored bears that live in interior areas where there is not a lot of salmon to eat. "Brown bear" refers to larger and darker bears in coastal areas where there are salmon.
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Grizzlies are among the largest living carnivores, according to the Animal Diversity Web (ADW). They are 3.3 to 9 feet (1 to 2.8 meters) in length and weigh 800 lbs. (363 kilograms). Grizzly bear tails are usually 2.6 to 8 inches (65 to 210 millimeters) long. When they stand upright on their hind legs, they can reach 8 feet (2.4 meters) tall.


Parks Canada Rangers are advising hikers to be alert for bears and take extra precautions to avoid an encounter.

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They advise park visitors to wear little bells on their clothes so they make noise when hiking. The bell noise allows bears to hear them coming from a distance and not be startled by a hiker accidentally sneaking up on them. This might cause a bear to charge.

Visitors should also carry a pepper spray can just in case a bear is encountered. Spraying the pepper into the air will irritate the bear's sensitive nose and it will run away.

Image result for hiker clipartIt is also a good idea to keep an eye out for fresh bear scat so you have an idea if bears are in the area. People should be able to recognize the difference between black bear and grizzly bear scat.

Black bear droppings are smaller and often contain berries, leaves, and possibly bits of fur.

Grizzly bear droppings tend to contain small bells and smell of pepper.
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